Return to site

What to Do When Your Baby/Child Falls

Providing relief for your child after the trauma

· first time mom,parenting tips,motherhood,new baby,new mom tips

As much as it may be very traumatizing to witness your child suffer a fall, especially when he's only a few months old, or you might just want to scream at the caregiver for allowing it to happen, you need to stay calm. You can re-evaluate the situation later and come up with better solutions to prevent future mishaps. But first, here are some things to look out for when your baby/child suffers a fall.

Note that you should closely monitor your child within the next 72 hours.

Seek immediate medical attention:

  • If your child becomes unconscious following the fall. In such situation, if you are worried that your child has severe injuries like broken bones, call for ambulance immediately and do not move the child, unless there's a risk of further injury if he's being left at the same spot.
  • If the soft spot near the top of his head feels tender or swollen
  • If your child throws up.
  • If your child seems to be unusually drowsy, or hard to wake from sleep.
  • If your child is bleeding profusely and doesn't seem to subside even after applying pressure for 5-10 minutes.
  • If your child is inconsolable even though you can't seem to find any external visible injuries.
  • If your child seem to be moving his limbs awkwardly or in an imbalanced manner.

What you can do to provide relief to your child right after the fall:

  • Gently pick him up and check for any signs of bruising, cuts or swelling. Cuddle him and soothe him! Most of the times, the fall is not as bad as the scare.
  • Apply cold compress if there's swelling or bruising. It may be uncomfortable for the child but try to distract him with a toy so that you can apply the cold compress for at least 20 minutes. It will significantly reduce any swelling. Cold compress can also be done every few hours over the next 2-3 days to help with reducing the swelling further.
  • If there's a bruise, avoid rubbing the area. Some people believe that when you massage the bruise, it will help to spread the blood clot and hasten the recovery. However, it is not recommended for young children because rubbing at the bruise might cause further injury to the tiny blood vessels in the area.
  • Use a clean cloth or gauze to apply pressure if there's a cut to stop the bleeding.
  • If the nose is bleeding, ask the child to sit up with head tilted down, and pinch the top of the nose bridge to stop the bleeding. Many adults tilt up the head during a nosebleed but it's actually not recommended because that would encourage blood flow back down the throat and end up swallowing the blood. Nose bleed should stop after 5-10 minutes.
  • If the child has fallen from a platform which is shorter than his height, it's usually not too hard a fall. But of course the impact of fall would also greatly depend on how he lands and onto what kind of surface he lands.

My children have had their fair share of falls and I had my fair share of fright, guilt and blame. Nobody willed the accidents to happen. It definitely doesn't help blaming the caregiver who was around at the time of accident. Sometimes out of anxiety and our care for our children, we want to point fingers at the caregiver who was present but didn't manage to stop the accident from happening. I have learnt that being the caregiver present is the most traumatizing because you witnessed how the child fell and didn't manage to react in time to save the child or simply couldn't. Obviously anybody would feel very terrible for being in that position, regardless helper, grandparent or parent. So focus on the child's well being instead of who to blame.

When a child is injured, the adults around may have different opinions about what to do. Rush him to A&E? Wait and see? I believe that the parents have the full autonomy over their children even though this sometimes result in conflict with grandparents. But don't ever be afraid of overreacting when it comes to the safety of your child. If you feel something amiss, just bring your child to the doctor. We'd always rather we have a peace of mind to know for certain our child is fine, isn't it?

All Posts
×

Almost done…

We just sent you an email. Please click the link in the email to confirm your subscription!

OKSubscriptions powered by Strikingly

Follow my blog with Bloglovin